Planes, Trains and Automobiles – Not as Good As The Movie

The train part of the journey was actually an easy and quite interesting part of the journey.

It’s the elevated train that takes you in and out of the airport to a nearby hotel that is a station for the hotel and rental car shuttle buses.

It has windshield wipers but there’s no one driving so the wipers don’t come on. It has anti-glare film on the side windows, so to see well or take pictures you have to go in the font or the back car. It’s totally free – no lines, no tickets.

If I had little kids to amuse I’d take them for a few rides back and forth. WOW Air? You get what you pay for. I played: “ Guess how much to go to Iceland?” with the guys at work. No one was even close.

The original cost of a round trip was $404.98 Canadian from T.O. However…. somebody didn’t buy cancellation insurance! They wanted to charge me over $800 to change flights due to the ice storm and reduced it to less than 600 when I said there was space on Iceland Air for less than what they wanted to switch me to a later plane. In the air a bottle of water is $3.00 Am., sandwiches $12.00, chocolate bar $8.00, alcohol over $10.00.

The best part is once in the air they offer you extra legroom for $56.00 Am.. You can move to a seat by the emergency exits, then move back to your smaller space when it’s time to land.

The Kroners were worth one American penny so I’ll give you prices in Am. currency, apply 33 percent more to get Canadian dollars.

The rental car in Iceland was a good little VW Polo with an automatic. It went up mountain roads on pavement and on dirt very well, had no trouble keeping out of the way of everybody speeding. They use 95 octane fuel, most vehicles would run better than here.

The fuel cost was 2.11 to 2.16 Am. per litre. Rental was a little over $60.00 Am per day with unlimited mileage. It had the annoying feature that shut itself off at intersections, then restarted when you take your foot off the brake.

That doesn’t work in Reykjavik… you get .001 seconds to move before somebody honks. In every town they have the automatic radar signs that show frown faces when everybody is zipping by well over the speed limit.

If you’re fastidious about speed limits, you better take a tour bus ( they speed too, though) . In Reykjavik the two lane streets had a 70 kmph limit but it looks like they drive 90 into the two lane roundabouts. An Audi SUV passed three or four of us on a double solid line in the tunnel under the ocean.

When I returned the car two other tourists were voicing their opinions about Iceland drivers. We agreed that the worst were the big farm trucks and the guys with the big tires, the bigger the tires, the worse the driver.

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