News — 01 August 2013

*Ed’s note: this story has been edited following it’s initial publication to address concerns over the context of comments made by  Insp. Kevin Glenister which he believes mischaracterized the views of the Police Service on the issue of urban deer.

By Amanda McAlpine

Neither the Dryden Police Service nor the Ministry of Natural Resources (MNR) is claiming responsibility to address an urban deer with an arrow in its back.

The doe lives near Open Roads School and is unable to care for her three fawns because of her injury. Residents are worried she may act erratically because of her limited mobility and are concerned for the public’s safety.

“The deer is scared and hurt,” said neighbourhood resident, Bev Robinson. “It could become frantic and someone could get injured. No one is able to get close enough to it to help.”

One resident expressed the deer kicked a dog before it was shot. Her concern is the deer may be even more aggressive with an arrow in its spine. Calls to the police were directed to the MNR and vice versa.

Dryden Police Inspector Kevin Glenister says the local police service are is a difficult position when it comes to addressing issues involving deer. Officers’ options are limited to destroying animals who are suffering, or that pose a threat to public safety.

“That isn’t always what people want,” said Glenister.

He adds that local law enforcement lacks the training and the resources to perform operations like tranquilizing and relocating animals.

The MNR says live capture in a residential setting can be risky for both the animals and nearby residents and not always result in a positive outcome, for which reasons they avoid it.

“We do not take action in this type of situation,” said MNR regional communications specialist, Michelle Nowak. “Deer are extremely high strung and tranquilizing deer is risky, especially in an urban setting, as the deer could dart away and injure someone.”

Nowak added cooperation continues between the MNR, the police and the City of Dryden to determine solutions to problem deer in urban areas. Both Thunder Bay and Kenora stage controlled deer hunts to reduce the urban deer population.


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(4) Readers Comments

  1. Something needs to be done. This animal is suffering, was shot out of season and has fawns. Kevin Glenister has proven to be a cruel, in humane and disgusting human lacking any compassion. I hope animal cruelty groups hear about this sooner than later.

  2. For heavens sake we’re supposed to be human aren’t we? Please get a vet out there to help it post haste, it is the only humane response required no questions asked. Where is the RSPCA (Royal Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (RSPCA)) in all of this????? Sure people run into them all the time (which if they had any brains they wouldn’t in the first place), but it’s no reason to let the poor thing suffer. Nature is under stress from mankind everyday, please don’t make it worse than it already is.
    Have a nice day.

  3. FYI –
    This article has been posted on several FB Animal Cruelty sites. Kevin Glenister has made a name for himself.

  4. I think they should’ve picked a different spokesperson for this article, besides Dryden Police Service inspector, Kevin Glenister! This is the kind of attitude that gets someone’s name plastered all over the SOCIAL MEDIA sites and are blacklisted by Animal Lovers and Activists…the problem is, is that this DOE has two babies to look after and someone tried to kill her with an arrow. Obviously NO ONE should be shooting at a DOE that has two BABIES…This sickens me, the person who did this to her makes me disgusted and this INSPECTOR KEVIN GLENISTER needs to find a new job…possibly on an island, away from humans and animals alike. Shame on you all for this uncaring attitude about our wildlife. Karma sucks, lets keep that in mind. 😛

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